Student Information on Academic Status

Academic Standing

Academic standing is a measure of your level of academic success. It may be based on your grade-point average for a single term, your cumulative grade-point average, your progress toward a degree, or some combination of those factors. In any case, it is intended as one measure of your academic achievement.

The notation of Dean's List on the academic record recognizes a strong academic performance (as defined by the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled) in a completed academic term. Typically, students awarded Dean's List have completed at least 12 graded hours with a GPA of 3.5 or higher and with no failing marks of any kind.

Part-time Dean's List recognizes students who, while not enrolled full time in any term during a year, have earned a GPA of 3.5 or higher while completing at least 12 graded hours during that year, with no failing marks of any kind.

If your cumulative grade-point average falls below a 2.0, you are considered to be in academic difficulty. Generally, this will result in your being placed on academic probation and may lead, if you are already on probation, to academic dismissal. If you feel that you are struggling academically (even if your cumulative GPA is above a 2.0), you should see your academic advisor as soon as possible, to discuss the issues that may be affecting your academic performance and to begin planning how to get back on track. It is your responsibility to know your academic status at all times; colleges notify students who fall into academic difficulty.

Academic Probation
You will be placed on academic probation when your cumulative grade-point average is below a 2.0. Your college or program office will notify you of your status and will list the conditions of your probation, including the minimum grade-point average you must achieve in the following semester to avoid academic dismissal. You should consult with an academic advisor. If you have raised your GPA to a 2.0 or higher after the following semester, you will be removed from probation but it will remain on your record for the term it was assigned.

Academic Warning
If your grade-point average falls only slightly below a 2.0 after your first semester, your college may decide to place you on academic warning instead of academic probation. We strongly recommend that you consult with an academic advisor about possible strategies to improve your academic standing. When your cumulative GPA reaches a 2.0, you will be removed from warning but it will remain on your record for the term it was assigned. If you do not reach a 2.0 after one term on warning, you will probably be placed on academic probation.

Special-Action Probation
When your college has determined, by a review of your grades and course work, that you are not making satisfactory progress toward the degree listed on your record, you may be placed on special-action probation, even if your GPA is above a 2.0. Your college or program office will inform you of your status, as well as the conditions of probation, including the minimum conditions you must meet in the following term to avoid academic dismissal. When you meet the conditions, you will be removed from probation but it will remain on your record for the term it was assigned.

Academic Dismissal
If you remain in academic difficulty for an extended period of time, you are at risk of being dismissed from the university. There is no particular cumulative GPA that warrants a dismissal. Decisions about dismissal are made on a case-by-case basis, given serious thought, and are NOT made without warning. You may be considered for dismissal if you have previously been on academic probation or if you do not show steady academic progress, especially in the area of your major. Dismissed students are always notified of their current dismissal status and are always given plenty of warnings prior to dismissal.

See an academic advisor for help in selecting appropriate courses, if you are interested in attending another institution with the goal of returning to Ohio State, or if you have questions/concerns about the decision to dismiss you.

If you are not showing progress in your current program, you are at risk of being dismissed from your college (or school) of enrollment. There is no particular cumulative GPA that warrants a dismissal. Decisions about dismissal are made on a case-by-case basis, given serious thought, and are NOT made without warning. Dismissed students are always notified of their status. If you need help in re-deciding on a major, you are encouraged to schedule an appointment with a University Exploration advisor.

If you are enrolled in University Exploration and are not making progress in selecting a major, you could be at risk from being programmatically dismissed from University Exploration, which means you will either need to decide on a major or take some time off from school until you are comfortable in selecting a program of study. Be proactive and explore your options with your assigned University Exploration advisor.

If you have questions about this information and how it relates to your specific situation, please contact your advisor.